Tag Archives: staff client

A quick Firebug tip for editing CSS

I’ve talked before about Firebug’s inspector tool for examinating the markup of a page and its associated style. When you inspect a particular element in the markup you can see the CSS rules that have been applied to it. But what if the styles applied to an element change based on user interaction? How do you “catch” the style of a hover interaction, or of an element which has focus?

For instance: In the Koha staff client there is a global style for the color of a link when you hover your cursor over it.

Koha link color on hover

This color is defined in the staff client’s main CSS file, staff-global.css:

a:hover, a:active {
color : #538200;
text-decoration: none;
}

However, if you use Firebug’s inspector to examine a link you won’t see that CSS:

Inspecting a link in the staff client

That’s because the Firebug inspector isn’t showing you the “hover” state of the link–at least not unless you’re mouse cursor is hovering over the link at the time:

Inspecting the link on hover

But what if we want to use Firebug’s Style tab to live-edit the CSS of the hover state? As soon as we move our mouse away from the link the hover state disappears from the style pane, so we can’t edit it. Luckily Firebug has an option built in for “activating” three different interaction states: Hover, Active, and Focus:

Firebug Style tab interaction options

By selecting “:hover” we can “pin” the hover state to keep it activated so that we can inspect and change it:

Edit the hover style in Firebug

We can test the “focus” option by inspecting the style of any standard text input in Koha, for example the barcode field on the check-in page:

Inspecting an element's :focus state in Firebug

This lets us see that there is a CSS rule defining a default border style for <input> and <textarea>

input:focus, textarea:focus {
border-color: #538200;
border-radius: 4px;
border-style: solid;
}

And from there we can customize away:

input:focus {
border-top: 5px solid #EF5959;
border-bottom: 5px solid #FF975F;
background-image: -webkit-gradient(linear, 0 0, 0 100%, from(#EF5959), to(#FF975F));
background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(#EF5959, #FF975F);
background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(#EF5959, #FF975F),
-moz-linear-gradient(#EF5959, #FF975F);
background-image: -o-linear-gradient(#EF5959, #FF975F),
-o-linear-gradient(#EF5959, #FF975F);
background-image: linear-gradient(#EF5959, #FF975F),
linear-gradient(#EF5959, #FF975F);
-moz-background-size:5px 100%;
background-size:5px 100%;
background-position:0 0, 100% 0;
background-repeat:no-repeat;
border-width: 5px 0;
padding: 5px;
}

A custom input border

Showing item type counts on the checkout screen

Does your library limit your patrons to a certain number of checkouts for certain item types? At the Athens County Public Libraries, for instance, we limit patrons to 10 audio books, 10 music CDs, 10 videos, and 5 DVDs at a time. If a patron tries to check out more than 5 DVDs, Koha will show a warning. But what if you want to be able to tell at a glance how many a patron has?

This functionality was available to us in our 2.x installation, but when we upgraded to 3.0 our support company at the time told us it wasn’t a customization they would support. This wasn’t a feature we were willing to give up, so I set out to duplicate it using the tools available to me: system preferences and JavaScript.

Information there for the taking

All the information we need can be found on the patron checkout screen, we just need to figure out how to get it. The page lists all the items checked out to the patron, and it shows the item type for each:

List of items checked out on the checkout screen

With this available to us we can use jQuery to count each instance of each item type. We need to build a count for each item type in our system, so the script isn’t very portable. It looks for table cells (“<td>“) containing the description of each of our item types:


var itypes = {'circ': 0, 'avid': 0, 'avbk': 0, 'avmu': 0, 'advd':0 };
$("#issuest td:contains('Circulating')").each(function(){
itypes["circ"]++;
});
$("#issuest td:contains('Videos')").each(function(){
itypes["avid"]++;
});
$("#issuest td:contains('DVDs')").each(function(){
itypes["advd"]++;
});
$("#issuest td:contains('Audio Books')").each(function(){
itypes["avbk"]++;
});
$("#issuest td:contains('Music CDs')").each(function(){
itypes["avmu"]++;
});

The script starts by setting up an array of all my item types (“circ,” “avid,” etc.) and giving each a value of zero. Then the script looks for instances of each item type description on the page,  “Circulating,” “Videos,” etc., using jQuery’s :contains selector. Each time it finds an instance of one of those text strings the script increments the count for that item type. At the end of the process the script will have the count for each item type.

Displaying the counts on the page

In order to show the item type counts on the page we need to lay some groundwork by adding some markup. I want to add the count information right after the “Checking out to…” heading, so I’ll find that element’s ID using FireBug and jQuery’s after() function:


$("#circ_circulation_issue label[for='barcode']").after( ... );

The HTML I’m going to add is the default state, so it shows a zero count for everything:


<p style="margin-top:1em">
<span id="avmuout">0</span> Music CDs out, <span id="avmuok">10</span> More Allowed
</p>
<p>
<span id="avbkout">0</span> Audio Books out, <span id="avbkok">10</span> More Allowed
</p>
<p>
<span id="avidout">0</span> Videos out, <span id="avidok">10</span> More Allowed
</p>
<p style="margin-bottom:1em">
<span id="advdout">0</span> DVDs out, <span id="advdok">5</span> More Allowed
</p>

I’ve  included unique IDs for the “count” spans so that I can easily update them with my script:


$("#avidout").html(String(itypes["avid"]));
$("#advdout").html(String(itypes["advd"]));
$("#avbkout").html(String(itypes["avbk"]));
$("#avmuout").html(String(itypes["avmu"]));

$("#avidok").html( 10 - itypes["avid"] );
$("#advdok").html( 5 - itypes["advd"] );
$("#avbkok").html( 10 - itypes["avbk"] );
$("#avmuok").html( 10 - itypes["avmu"] );

In the first of the two sections above I take the count I got earlier, itypes['avid'] and set the content of the corresponding <span> using the html() function. I also want to show how many more the patron can check out, so I subtract the count from the limits I’ve set in my Koha installation.

If you have patrons who have exceeded their checkout limit you’ll see a problem: The page will tell you they’re allowed to check out a negative number more items. We can correct the script to accommodate:


$("#avidok").html((10-itypes["avid"] &gt; 0) ? 10-itypes["avid"] : 0);
$("#advdok").html((5-itypes["advd"] &gt; 0) ? 5-itypes["advd"] : 0);
$("#avbkok").html((10-itypes["avbk"] &gt; 0) ? 10-itypes["avbk"] : 0);
$("#avmuok").html((10-itypes["avmu"] &gt; 0) ? 10-itypes["avmu"] : 0);

Final version

Here’s what the results look like:

The final version includes proper escaping of the HTML content and wraps the whole process into a function (“itemTypeCount”). This function will be called on page load only if jQuery finds that the table of checkouts, which has an ID “issuest” is being displayed. The whole script goes into Koha’s intranetuserjs system preference.


function itemTypeCount(){
$("#circ_circulation_issue label[for='barcode']").after("<p style="margin-top:1em" class="icount"><span id="avmuout">0</span> Music CDs out, <span id="avmuok">10</span> More Allowed</p> <p class="icount"><span id="avbkout">0</span> Audio Books out, <span id="avbkok">10</span> More Allowed</p> <p class="icount"><span id="avidout">0</span> Videos out, <span id="avidok">10</span> More Allowed</p> <p style="margin-bottom:1em" class="icount"><span id="advdout">0</span> DVDs out, <span id="advdok">5</span> More Allowed</p>");

var itypes = {'circ': 0, 'avid': 0, 'avbk': 0, 'avmu': 0, 'advd':0 };
$("#issuest td:contains('Circulating')").each(function(){
itypes["circ"]++;
});
$("#issuest td:contains('Videos')").each(function(){
itypes["avid"]++;
});
$("#issuest td:contains('DVD')").each(function(){
itypes["advd"]++;
});
$("#issuest td:contains('Audio Books')").each(function(){
itypes["avbk"]++;
});
$("#issuest td:contains('Music CDs')").each(function(){
itypes["avmu"]++;
});
$("#avidout").html(String(itypes["avid"]));
$("#advdout").html(String(itypes["advd"]));
$("#avbkout").html(String(itypes["avbk"]));
$("#avmuout").html(String(itypes["avmu"]));
$("#avidok").html((10-itypes["avid"] &gt; 0) ? 10-itypes["avid"] : 0);
$("#advdok").html((5-itypes["advd"] &gt; 0) ? 5-itypes["advd"] : 0);
$("#avbkok").html((10-itypes["avbk"] &gt; 0) ? 10-itypes["avbk"] : 0);
$("#avmuok").html((10-itypes["avmu"] &gt; 0) ? 10-itypes["avmu"] : 0);
}
$(document).ready(function(){
if(document.getElementById("issuest")){
itemTypeCount();
}
});

Caveats

This system works very well for my library, but it comes with a few caveats:

It requires that you hard-code, in the script, handling for each of your Koha item types.

Besides being tedious, it also requires that you modify the script each time you change your item types.

It requires that you hard-code the correct item type limits.

Also tedious, and requires that you modify the script each time you change your circulation rules.

It creates a potential collision with both call numbers and titles.

If my item type description is “DVD” and my call number includes the text “DVD” as well I’ll get an inaccurate count. If my item type description is “Audio Books” and a patron has checked out a print book entitled Audio Books for long trips I’ll get an inaccurate count.

For us the disadvantages are not unwieldy and the collision problem has never caused a problem. The advantage we get is being able to tell at a glance whether the patron is going to be able to check out that stack of DVDs or whether we need to ask them to put some back. Better to ask them to pick their favorites up front rather than after we’ve already checked out some of them.

Customizing the staff client login logo: Addendum

I left something out of my post on Customizing the staff client login logo that I wanted to be sure to add: Once you’ve changed the logo you may want to change where it links to as well. By default it links to the Koha web site (or the deprecated version if your installation is an older one). We can use a little snippet of jQuery to change that link.

Using jQuery to change the URL to which the staff client logo links

$("#login h1 a").attr("href","http://www.myacpl.org");

That looks for an <a> tag inside an <h1> inside <div id="login">, which is specific enough to only catch the login form. This snippet goes inside your intranetuserjs system preference. Assuming the only thing you’ve added to intranetuserjs is the code I covered in the previous post, this would be the revised version:

$(document).ready(function(){
$(“#login h1 a”).attr(“href”,”http://www.myacpl.org”);
});
// ]]>


// <![CDATA[
//

Customizing the staff client login logo

A Koha user (from Tanzania!) asked today on the Koha mailing list, “I need some help on how to customize the staff client login page/replace koha logo with a new one.” I haven’t heard this request before, so it’s a good opportunity to investigate.

If this were the OPAC we could use a system preference, opacsmallimage, to change the logo. We don’t have that option in the staff client, so we’ll have to see if we can use the available customization options to accomplish the same thing.

Our first stop, as usual, is FireBug. I opened up the staff client to examine how the default Koha logo is displayed on the login form. Using the Inspect tool I highlight the logo and view the results in the FireBug HTML inspector window:

FireBug details for the login logo anchor tag

The logo is constructed by nesting a link (“anchor”) tag (<a>) inside a top-level heading tag (<h1>). The above screenshot shows the HTML and style details for the <a>, here are the results for the <h1>:

FireBug details for the login logo heading tag

From this we can collect all the CSS information we need to control the display of the login logo:

#login h1 a {
border-bottom:medium none;
display:block;
height:74px;
text-indent:-1000px;
}

#login h1 {
background:url("../../img/koha-logo.gif") no-repeat scroll center top transparent;
margin-bottom:0.5em;
margin-top:0;
}

The staff client logo is displayed using an image-replacement technique similar to the one used to display the Koha logo in the OPAC. The style of the anchor tag sets an explicit height which matches the logo image, and it sets a negative text-indent property which moves the text contents of the tag off the screen. These two properties create a blank space inside the anchor tag in which to display the logo.

The style of the heading tag does the work of displaying the logo. The background property points to the URL of the logo image. In the default case this is an image file on the Koha server’s file system. The URL doesn’t have to be a relative one, though. It can be a full URL pointing to anywhere on the internet.

Customizing the logo CSS

In order to change the image we need to make very simple changes to two CSS properties:

  1. The background-image of the <h1> tag.
  2. The height of the <a> tag.

Let’s use as an example the logo on the Athens County Public Libraries site. I can right-click the image in Firefox and choose “View image” to find the details I need. The location bar shows the URL I need, and the title bar shows the dimensions of the image. I just need to note the height.

Since we only need to change two properties, our custom CSS is simpler than the original. We only need to specify the properties which we need to override:

#login h1 a {
height:71px;
}

#login h1 {
background:url("http://www.myacpl.org/sites/all/themes/npl/logo.png") no-repeat scroll center top transparent;
}

Applying the custom CSS

We’ve got our custom CSS, now what do we do with it? We don’t have an opacsmallimage preference for the staff client, and we don’t even have an option like OPACUserCSS. We do have a couple of options which will work.

intranetcolorstylesheet

If you have access to your Koha server’s file system you can add a stylesheet there and tell Koha to apply it in addition to the default staff client stylesheet. For example, you could create a new CSS file called custom.css and save it alongside staff-global.css and the other staff client CSS files. Then you can specify that filename, custom.css, in the intranetcolorstylesheet system preference.

intranetuserjs

If you don’t have access to your Koha server’s file system, there’s a way to insert custom CSS into your staff client pages, but it’s a bit of a hack. Lacking an “intranetusercss” preference we’re going to hijack an existing preference, intranetuserjs, to do the job for us.

When you insert custom JavaScript into the intranetuserjs preference, Koha detects this and adds it to the header of each staff client page, wrapped in the appropriate <script> tags:


// 


Since Koha automatically wraps the intranetuserjs content in opening and closing <script> tags, we’ll have to do a little bit of roundabout coding to embed a <style> block:


//


/* Custom styles here */


// 

Let’s run down what’s happening here. Lines 1 and 2 have been inserted automatically by Koha in order to properly embed the custom JavaScript it expects from the intranetuserjs preference. Line 3 is the first line of the contents of intranetuserjs. Lines 4 and 5 we have added manually to close the automatically-embedded <script> tag. With the script tag closed we can go on to add just about any HTML we want, really, but this is all inside the <head> of the HTML document, so few things would be valid.

Lines 6, 7, and 8 show the <style> tag we’re adding. This is where we’re going to put our custom CSS. Lines 9, 10, and 11 are the last lines of our custom intranetuserjs. Knowing that Koha wants to close the <script> tag it opened on line 1, we have to re-open a new <script> tag so that when Koha closes it we’ll have valid markup.

Putting it all together, here’s what the contents of our intranetuserjs preference will be:

// ]]>



/* Custom styles here */
#login h1 a {
height:71px;
}
#login h1 {
background:url("https://www.example.com/images/logo.png") no-repeat scroll center top transparent;
}


// <![CDATA[

If all goes well, this is what you should see when you log out and look at your login screen:

id=”attachment_633″ align=”aligncenter” width=”300″ caption=”Customized login form”

Note: I’ve published a quick addendum to this post which covers using jQuery to change the URL to which the logo links

Quick patron add?

Someone posted an enhancement request today requesting a change to the way the patron entry form is arranged in the Koha staff client. By default the patron entry form is pretty long, and the request asks that required fields be grouped at the top.

It seems like a reasonable request, but there’s a big disadvantage to trying to solve this problem with a template-only change: Libraries can customize which fields are mandatory when entering patrons. The system preference for that is  BorrowerMandatoryField (“borrower” being the term used in place of “patron” at the time of the preference’s creation).

What alternatives might there be to a template-only solution?

  1. Alter the script which generates the patron entry form so that any required fields (no matter which ones they are) are displayed at the top.
  2. Create a “quick-add” form which shows only required fields.
  3. Add a filter to the full patron entry form to toggle display of non-mandatory fields.

I like option two as a long-term solution, but option three could be implemented now with some custom JavaScript. Here’s a proof-of-concept script to show that using the markup which exists in the form now we can pull only required fields:


$(document).ready(function(){
var list = "<fieldset class="rows"><legend>Quick Add<ol>";
$("label.required").each(function(){
item = $(this).parent().html()
item = "<li>"+item+"</li>";
list += item;
});
list += "</ol></fieldset><fieldset class="action"><a href="/cgi-bin/koha/members/member.pl" class="cancel">Cancel</a></fieldset>";
$("#entryform").prepend(list);
});

Paste that into your intranetuserjs system preference or into Firebug’s command line to give it a try. Note that this solution assumes two things:

  1. You’ve already specified a patron category (by choosing one from the “new” menu).
  2. You’re adding patrons to the default branch for your logged-in user.

Of course the form could be customized to include these choices, but they’re probably safe assumptions for quick adds. A better implementation of this would probably allow you to toggle between either view: quick or standard.